Baseball In Long Beach

Author: Bob Keisser
Publisher: Arcadia Publishing
ISBN: 9781625840660
Size: 12.33 MB
Format: PDF, Mobi
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More than two hundred Major League Baseball players have hailed from Long Beach and its suburbs. This hotbed of horsehide heroics includes Hall of Famers Bob Lemon, Duke Snider and Tony Gwynn, as well as longtime stars Ron Fairly, Bob Bailey, Bobby Grich, Chase Utley and Jered Weaver. Negro League and Pacific Coast League clubs enjoyed Long Beach connections. Many players whose cleats tore up legendary Rec Park and Blair Field are enshrined in the city's baseball/softball hall of fame. The winning tradition continues as Long Beach State's "Dirtbags" sent more players to the bigs in 2010 and 2011 than any other college. Join baseball historian Bob Keisser as he recounts Long Beach's greatest baseball stars, teams and stories.

100 Years Of Who S Who In Baseball

Author: Douglas B. Lyons
Publisher: Rowman & Littlefield
ISBN: 9781493017225
Size: 20.14 MB
Format: PDF, Kindle
View: 56

In celebration of the 100th issue of Who’s Who in Baseball—one of the game’s most venerable publications—comes a century's worth of the annual's iconic covers, insightful breakdowns of the players featured on those covers, and informative accounts of the baseball history tied to each year’s issue. 100 Years of Who’s Who in Baseball is a colorful, must-have book of baseball nostalgia for fans of the American Pastime. The start of the baseball season brings with it a host of annual traditions and reminders, and one of the most beloved—the annual Who’s Who in Baseball—arrives on newsstands across the country every Spring Training. The 2015 season marks 100 years of Who’s Who delivering year-by-year stats to generations of baseball fans to quickly and easily track a player’s performance from the minors to the majors. And while Who’s Who is trusted as an authoritative source of baseball statistics and has been used by generations of club executives, broadcasters, journalists, and fans—it’s the publication’s cover subject that each year generates as much hot-stove speculation and buzz as off-season rumors of trades, firings, and pitching rotations. In partnership with Who’s Who in Baseball, this celebratory book features each of the annual's 100 iconic covers in full color along with an account of why the player rated the cover and what was going on in baseball at the time. From baseball’s deadball era to the dawn of “replay review,” this collection offers a gorgeously illustrated history of the game.

Who S On Worst

Author: Filip Bondy
Publisher: Anchor
ISBN: 9780385536134
Size: 11.71 MB
Format: PDF, ePub, Docs
View: 57

Who were the best ballplayers of all time? It's an endless question, but here's something much more fun: Who was the worst of all time? Who was the lousiest pitcher? The biggest goat? The most despicable owner? The most over-paid bum? Finally, Filip Bondy answers these questions, wielding his own brand of formidable research, advanced sabermetrics and considerable wit to provide this indispensable guide to the less glorious side of our national pastime. Each chapter is filled with rich and colorful stories about the players unfortunate enough to be chosen in each category--like "Too Fat to Bat" or "Anyone Seen My Mitt." So welcome to the Hall of Shame. It's awesome.

Who S Who In Cuban Baseball 1878 1961

Author: Jorge S. Figueredo
Publisher: McFarland
ISBN: 9780786430307
Size: 15.42 MB
Format: PDF, Mobi
View: 56

True professional baseball has not been played in Cuba since banned by the communist regime after the 1961 season, but there is a legacy of more than 70 years of continuous excellence by countless Cubans who played in the organized leagues of the island from 1878 to 1961. Scores of North Americans, white and black, and Latin Americans also played in Cuba during that time. Biographical and season-by-season statistical information for the many hundreds of Cuban, North American and Latin American players who took part in the Cuban leagues from 1878 to 1961 has been compiled in this work. The time period is divided into three eras. The first is from 1878 to 1899, the primitive years of the Cuban league; the second, 1900 to 1933, when the league opened its doors to welcome foreign players; and the third, from 1934 to 1961, the golden age that made Cuba then the second power in organized baseball. Birth and death dates for each player (if they could be determined) are provided. The statistical information for players includes the number of games played, at bats, hits, doubles, triples, home runs, and season average. The statistical information for pitchers includes the number of games pitched, complete games, win-loss record, and winning percentage.

The Cooperstown Symposium On Baseball And American Culture 1999

Author: Peter M. Rutkoff
Publisher: McFarland
ISBN: 0786408324
Size: 18.42 MB
Format: PDF, ePub, Docs
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This is an anthology of 23 papers that were presented at the Eleventh Cooperstown Symposium on Baseball and American Culture, held June 9-11, 1999, and co-sponsored by the State University of New York at Oneonta and the National Baseball Hall of Fame and Museum. The papers focus on the antecedents of baseball and the early history of America's national pastime and are divided into five parts: "Baseball and the American Imagination," "Baseball and American Culture," "Baseball and American Society," "Baseball and American Business" and "Baseball and the Fan." The preface is by series editor Alvin L. Hall, and an introduction is provided by the editor of the volume, Peter M. Rutkoff.

Major League Baseball In The 1970s

Author: Joseph G. Preston
Publisher: McFarland
ISBN: 9780786415922
Size: 16.30 MB
Format: PDF, Kindle
View: 38

Many of the most powerful trends in baseball today have their roots in the 1970s. Baseball entered that decade seriously behind the times in race relations, attitudes toward conformity versus individuality, and the manager-player relationship. In a sense, much of the wrenching change that American society as a whole experienced in the 1960s was played out in baseball in the following decade. Additionally, the game itself was rapidly evolving, with the inauguration of the designated hitter rule in the American League, the evolution of the closer, the development of the five-man starting rotation, the acceptance of strikeout lions like Dave Kingman and Bobby Bonds and the proliferation of stolen bases. This book opens with a discussion of the challenges that faced baseball's movers and shakers when they gathered in Bal Harbour, Florida, for the annual winter meetings on December 2, 1969. Their worst nightmares would be realized in the coming years. For many and often contradictory reasons the 1970s game evolved into a war of competing ideologies--escalating salaries, an acrimonious strike, Sesame Street-style team mascots, and the breaking of the time-honored tradition that all players, including the pitcher, must play on offense as well as defense--that would ultimately spell doom for the majority of attendees.

Split Season 1981

Author: Jeff Katz
Publisher: Macmillan
ISBN: 9781466843776
Size: 16.98 MB
Format: PDF, ePub, Docs
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The never-before-told story of the momentous season torn in half by the bitter players strike. 1981 was a watershed moment in American sports, when players turned an oligarchy of owners into a game where they had a real voice. Midway through the season, a game-changing strike ripped baseball apart, the first time a season had ever been stopped in the middle because of a strike. Marvin Miller and the MLB Players Association squared off against Baseball Commissioner Bowie Kuhn and the owners in a fight to protect players rights to free agency and defend America's pastime. Though a time bomb was ticking as the 1981 season began, the game rose to impressive---and now legendary---heights. Pete Rose chased Stan Musial's National League hit record and rookie Fernando Valenzuela was creating a sensation as the best pitcher in the majors when the stadiums went dark and the players went on strike. For the first time in modern history, there were first- and second-half champions; the two teams with the overall best records in the National League were not awarded play-off berths. When the season resumed after an absence of 712 games, Rose's resumption of his pursuit, the resurgence of Reggie Jackson, the rise of the Montreal Expos, and a Nolan Ryan no-hitter became notable events. The Dodgers bested their longtime rivals in a Yankees-Dodgers World Series, the last classic matchup of those storied opponents. Sourcing incredible and extensive interviews with almost all of the major participants in the strike, Split Season: 1981 returns us to the on- and off-field drama of an unforgettable baseball year.