Voyages

Author: Cathy Small
Publisher: Cornell University Press
ISBN: 9780801463266
Size: 18.74 MB
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In Voyages, Cathy A. Small offers a view of the changes in migration, globalization, and ethnographic fieldwork over three decades. The second edition shows how immigration and globalization have affected family, economy, tradition, and identity.

Voyages

Author: Cathy Small
Publisher: Cornell University Press
ISBN: 0801484367
Size: 18.91 MB
Format: PDF, ePub, Mobi
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"Small's commentaries are graceful, informative, and seasoned by a very deep knowledge of Tongan culture. This book includes one of the sanest and most convincing arguments that I have read for experimentation in the writing of ethnography, which is supported by the text itself as an exemplar of a modest, theoretically unpretentious experiment that works very well indeed."--George E. Marcus, Rice University"While a few Californians may be aware of the Tongan immigrant population in their midst, most Americans are unaware that the United States is a major terminus for the people of Tonga, an island nation in the South Pacific. Small examines Tongan migration to the United States in a 'transnational' perspective, stressing that many of the new migrant populations seem successfully to manage dual lives, in both the old country and the new. To that end, she describes life in contemporary Tongan communities and in U.S. settings."--Library JournalThis book documents the momentous social phenomena of mass migration from agricultural ex-colonies and ex-protectorates to the industrial world. Cathy A. Small provides the poignant perspective of one extended family and one village in the Kingdom of Tonga, an independent island nation in the South Pacific which has lost one third of its population to migration since the mid-1960s. Moving between Tonga and California, Small chronicles the experiences of a family from the village of 'Olunga. Some members stayed and some migrated to California, in successive waves in the 1960s-1990s. Through their lives, she presents a striking picture of Tongan culture in the United States. Returning to 'Olunga with family members and their American-born children, Small shows what happened to village life and to kin relationships thirty years after migration began.

Voyages

Author: Cathy Small
Publisher: Cornell University Press
ISBN: 0801434122
Size: 16.40 MB
Format: PDF, Mobi
View: 42

This book documents an instance of one of the most momentous social phenomena of the late twentieth century: the mass migration of the world's population from agricultural ex-colonies and ex-protectorates to the industrial world. Cathy A. Small provides the poignant perspective of one extended family and one village in the Kingdom of Tonga, an independent island nation in the South Pacific that has lost one third of its population to migration since the mid-1960s. Moving between Tonga and California, Small chronicles the experiences over a generation of the people who left the village of 'Olunga (a fictitious name to preserve anonymity) and the people who stayed. She follows successive branches of one family, who settled in California from the 1960s to the 1990s, sketching a striking picture of Tongan culture in the United States. She then returns to 'Olunga with Tongan emigrants and their U.S.-born children and shows what has happened to village life and to kin relationships thirty years after migration began. Throughout the narrative, small examines her own experience as an anthropologist, asking how the migration of Tongans has affected what she sees and the way she writes.

Beautiful Flowers Of The Maquiladora

Author: Norma Iglesias Prieto
Publisher: University of Texas Press
ISBN: 9780292788688
Size: 20.22 MB
Format: PDF, Kindle
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Published originally as La flor mas bella de la maquiladora, this beautifully written book is based on interviews the author conducted with more than fifty Mexican women who work in the assembly plants along the U.S.-Mexico border. A descriptive analytic study conducted in the late 1970s, the book uses compelling testimonials to detail the struggles these women face. The experiences of women in maquiladoras are attracting increasing attention from scholars, especially in the context of ongoing Mexican migration to the country's northern frontier and in light of the North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA). This book is among the earliest accounts of the physical and psychological toll exacted from the women who labor in these plants. Iglesias Prieto captures the idioms of these working women so that they emerge as dynamic individuals, young and articulate personalities, inexorably engaged in the daily struggle to change the fundamental conditions of their exploitation.

Paradise Remade

Author: Elizabeth Buck
Publisher: Temple University Press
ISBN: 1439906084
Size: 19.95 MB
Format: PDF, Mobi
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This is a book about the politics of competing cultures and myths in a colonized nation. Elizabeth Buck considers the transformation of Hawaiian culture focusing on the indigenous population rather than on the colonizers. She describes how Hawaii's established religious, social, political, and economic relationships have changed in the past 200 years as a result of Western imperialism. Her account is particularly timely in light of the current Hawaiian demands for sovereignty 100 years after the overthrow of the monarchy in 1893. Buck examines the social transformation Hawaii from a complex hierarchical, oral society to an American state dominated by corporate tourism and its myths of paradise. She pays particular attention to the ways contemporary Hawaiians are challenging the use of their traditions as the basis for exoticized entertainment. Buck demonstrates that sacred chants and hula were an integral part of Hawaiian social life; as the repository of the people's historical memory, chants and hula practices played a vital role in maintaining the links between religious, political, and economic relationships. Tracing the ways in which Hawaiian culture has been variously suppressed and constructed by Western explorers, New England missionaries, the tourist industry, ethnomusicologists, and contemporary Hawaiians, Buck offers a fascinating "rereading" of Hawaiian history.

Twisted Histories Altered Contexts

Author: Deborah B. Gewertz
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
ISBN: 0521395879
Size: 11.70 MB
Format: PDF, Docs
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Deborah Gewertz and Frederick Errington have worked as anthropologists in Papua New Guinea for nearly two decades. In this, their second joint study of the Chambri, they consider the way those in a small-scale society, peripheral to the major centers of influence, struggle to sustain some degree of autonomy. They describe the Chambri caught up in world processes of social and cultural change, and attempt to create a "collective biography" that conveys the intelligibility and significance of the twentieth century experience of these Papua New Guineans whom they have come to know well. This biography consists of interlocking stories, twisted histories, commentaries and contexts about Chambri who are negotiating their objectives while entangled in systemic change and confronting Western representations of modernization and development.

Becoming Tongan

Author: Helen Morton
Publisher: University of Hawaii Press
ISBN: 0824817958
Size: 14.71 MB
Format: PDF, ePub, Mobi
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"The sophisticated interweaving of theoretical analysis with rich descriptions of the everyday practices and experiences of Tongan children results in a highly readable account of children's behaviour and child-rearing practices in contemporary Tonga.... A welcome and valuable contribution to an emerging Pacific literature." --Journal of the Polynesian Society In this first detailed account of growing up in Tonga, Helen Morton focuses on the influence of anga fakatonga ("the Tongan way") in all facets of Tongan childhood, from the antenatal period to late adolescence. Childhood is a crucial period when cultural identity and notions of tradition are constructed, as well as beliefs about self, personhood, and emotion. Based on her anthropological fieldwork and her experiences in Tonga over several years, Morton traces the Tongan socialization process--from being vale (ignorant, socially incompetent) to becoming poto (clever, socially competent)--in fascinating detail. The socialization of emotion is also given detailed attention, especially the management of anger and emphasis on emotional restraint.