Reasoning About Luck

Author: Vinay Ambegaokar
Publisher: Courier Dover Publications
ISBN: 9780486818795
Size: 12.60 MB
Format: PDF, Kindle
View: 47

This book introduces college students and other readers to the uses of probability and statistics in the physical sciences, focusing on thermal and statistical physics and touching upon quantum physics. Widely praised as beautifully written and thoughtful, Reasoning About Luck explains concepts in a way that readers can understand and enjoy, even students who are not specializing in science and those outside the classroom — only some familiarity with basic algebra is necessary. Attentive readers will come away with a solid grasp of many of the basic concepts of physics and some excellent insights into the way physicists think and work. "If students who are not majoring in science understood no more physics than that presented by Ambegaokar, they would have a solid basis for thinking about physics and the other sciences." — Physics Today. "There is a real need for rethinking how we teach thermal physics—at all levels, but especially to undergraduates. Professor Ambegaokar has done just that, and given us an outstanding and ambitious textbook for nonscience majors. I find Professor Ambegaokar's style throughout the book to be graceful and witty, with a nice balance of both encouragement and admonishment." — American Journal of Physics.

Reasoning About Luck

Author: Vinay Ambegaokar
Publisher: Courier Dover Publications
ISBN: 9780486807010
Size: 13.91 MB
Format: PDF, Kindle
View: 57

This book introduces college students and other readers to the uses of probability and statistics in the physical sciences, focusing on thermal and statistical physics and touching upon quantum physics. Widely praised as beautifully written and thoughtful, Reasoning About Luck explains concepts in a way that readers can understand and enjoy, even students who are not specializing in science and those outside the classroom — only some familiarity with basic algebra is necessary. Attentive readers will come away with a solid grasp of many of the basic concepts of physics and some excellent insights into the way physicists think and work. "If students who are not majoring in science understood no more physics than that presented by Ambegaokar, they would have a solid basis for thinking about physics and the other sciences." — Physics Today. "There is a real need for rethinking how we teach thermal physics—at all levels, but especially to undergraduates. Professor Ambegaokar has done just that, and given us an outstanding and ambitious textbook for nonscience majors. I find Professor Ambegaokar's style throughout the book to be graceful and witty, with a nice balance of both encouragement and admonishment." — American Journal of Physics.

Reasoning About Luck

Author: Vinay Ambegaokar
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
ISBN: 0521447372
Size: 15.48 MB
Format: PDF, Docs
View: 58

This book introduces the reader to statistical reasoning and its use in physics. It differs from other treatments of physics for nonscientists in its wide-ranging use of quantitative methods, which assume only that the reader can add, subtract, multiply and divide with confidence. The author begins with a self-contained introduction to the everyday uses of probability, including the quantitative assessment of statistical information. The author develops the basic idea of mechanical motion, the molecular theory of gases, entropy as a measure of molecular agitation, limitations on the conversion of heat to work, the physics of the direction of time; chaos, and the role of probability in quantum mechanics. To aid self instruction, there are solved problems at the end of each chapter. This book is perfect for undergraduate physics students and nonscience majors.

I M Feeling Lucky

Author: Douglas Edwards
Publisher: Houghton Mifflin Harcourt
ISBN: 9780547416991
Size: 18.33 MB
Format: PDF, Mobi
View: 83

An early Google director of marketing and brand management discusses the pioneering work of partners Larry Page and Sergey Brin, the evolution of the company's non-hierarchical structure, and the competitive environment through which ideas are developed and implemented.

Hard Luck

Author: Neil Levy
Publisher: Oxford University Press on Demand
ISBN: 9780199601387
Size: 11.37 MB
Format: PDF, Docs
View: 36

The concept of luck plays an important role in debates concerning free will and moral responsibility. Neil Levy presents an original account of luck and argues that it undermines our freedom and moral responsibility no matter whether determinism is true or not.

The Eudemian Ethics On The Voluntary Friendship And Luck

Author: Fiona Leigh
Publisher: BRILL
ISBN: 9789004225367
Size: 15.96 MB
Format: PDF, Mobi
View: 93

The papers in this collection on Aristotle’s Eudemian Ethics by Charles, Rowe, McCabe, Whiting, and Buddensiek, offer new readings of Aristotle on the voluntary, friendship, and good fortune in the EE, by treating the EE on its own terms.

What The Luck The Surprising Role Of Chance In Our Everyday Lives

Author: Gary Smith
Publisher: The Overlook Press
ISBN: 9781468313918
Size: 14.48 MB
Format: PDF, ePub, Mobi
View: 11

The newest book by the acclaimed author of Standard Deviations takes on luck, and all the mischief the idea of luck can cause in our lives. In Israel, pilot trainees who were praised for doing well subsequently performed worse, while trainees who were yelled at for doing poorly performed better. It is an empirical fact that highly intelligent women tend to marry men who are less intelligent. Students who get the highest scores in third grade generally get lower scores in fourth grade. And yet, it's wrong to conclude that screaming is not more effective in pilot training, women choose men whose intelligence does not intimidate them, or schools are failing third graders. In fact, there's one reason for each of these empirical facts: Statistics. Specifically, a statical concept called Regression to the Mean. Regression to the mean seeks to explain, with statistics, the role of luck in our day to day lives. An insufficient appreciation of luck and chance can wreak all kinds of mischief in sports, education, medicine, business, politics, and more. It can lead us to see illness when we are not sick and to see cures when treatments are worthless. Perfectly natural random variation can lead us to attach meaning to the meaningless. Freakonomics showed how economic calculations can explain seemingly counterintuitive decision-making. Thinking, Fast and Slow, helped readers identify a host of small cognitive errors that can lead to miscalculations and irrational thought. In What the Luck?, statistician and author Gary Smith sets himself a similar goal, and explains--in clear, understandable, and witty prose--how a statistical understanding of luck can change the way we see just about every aspect of our lives...and can help us learn to rely less on random chance, and more on truth.