Linking Picture Book Biographies To National Content Standards 200 Lives To Explore

Author: Liz Deskins
Publisher: ABC-CLIO
ISBN: 9781440835247
Size: 13.28 MB
Format: PDF, Mobi
View: 96

Presenting beautifully illustrated picture book biographies, this book pairs narrative nonfiction biographies rich in language and illustrations with national content standards in the social studies, science, and the arts. • Provides more than 100 picture book biographies (primarily from 2010 to the present) that offer the newest in engaging literature • Supplies lessons and units of instruction—including technology and web tools—that can be used to teach collaboratively with content area teachers • Links directly to national content area standards to ensure rigorous teaching • Provides clear evidence of the value of using higher-level picture books with middle grade students • Lends the unique perspective of authors who hold graduate degrees in children's literature, have been book reviewers for many years, have presented at state and national conferences on children's literature, and possess extensive experience with review committees of children's resources at the state and national levels on the subject of determining the quality of books for children

A Picture Book Of Anne Frank

Author: Karen Ritz
Publisher:
ISBN: 1430113650
Size: 19.64 MB
Format: PDF, ePub
View: 12

"The narrator, reading with clarity and precision, tells the well-known story of the Jewish girl and her family who hid during the Holocaust...[This] high-quality read-along...[is] excellent for school and public libraries." - Booklist

Henry David Thoreau

Author: Laura Dassow Walls
Publisher: University of Chicago Press
ISBN: 9780226344720
Size: 18.46 MB
Format: PDF, ePub, Mobi
View: 84

“Walden. Yesterday I came here to live.” That entry from the journal of Henry David Thoreau, and the intellectual journey it began, would by themselves be enough to place Thoreau in the American pantheon. His attempt to “live deliberately” in a small woods at the edge of his hometown of Concord has been a touchstone for individualists and seekers since the publication of Walden in 1854. But there was much more to Thoreau than his brief experiment in living at Walden Pond. A member of the vibrant intellectual circle centered on his neighbor Ralph Waldo Emerson, he was also an ardent naturalist, a manual laborer and inventor, a radical political activist, and more. Many books have taken up various aspects of Thoreau’s character and achievements, but, as Laura Dassow Walls writes, “Thoreau has never been captured between covers; he was too quixotic, mischievous, many-sided.” Two hundred years after his birth, and two generations after the last full-scale biography, Walls restores Henry David Thoreau to us in all his profound, inspiring complexity. Walls traces the full arc of Thoreau’s life, from his early days in the intellectual hothouse of Concord, when the American experiment still felt fresh and precarious, and “America was a family affair, earned by one generation and about to pass to the next.” By the time he died in 1862, at only forty-four years of age, Thoreau had witnessed the transformation of his world from a community of farmers and artisans into a bustling, interconnected commercial nation. What did that portend for the contemplative individual and abundant, wild nature that Thoreau celebrated? Drawing on Thoreau’s copious writings, published and unpublished, Walls presents a Thoreau vigorously alive in all his quirks and contradictions: the young man shattered by the sudden death of his brother; the ambitious Harvard College student; the ecstatic visionary who closed Walden with an account of the regenerative power of the Cosmos. We meet the man whose belief in human freedom and the value of labor made him an uncompromising abolitionist; the solitary walker who found society in nature, but also found his own nature in the society of which he was a deeply interwoven part. And, running through it all, Thoreau the passionate naturalist, who, long before the age of environmentalism, saw tragedy for future generations in the human heedlessness around him. “The Thoreau I sought was not in any book, so I wrote this one,” says Walls. The result is a Thoreau unlike any seen since he walked the streets of Concord, a Thoreau for our time and all time.

Inquiry And The National Science Education Standards

Author: Committee on the Development of an Addendum to the National Science Education Standards on Scientific Inquiry
Publisher: National Academies Press
ISBN: 9780309064767
Size: 20.86 MB
Format: PDF, ePub, Docs
View: 46

Humans, especially children, are naturally curious. Yet, people often balk at the thought of learning science--the "eyes glazed over" syndrome. Teachers may find teaching science a major challenge in an era when science ranges from the hardly imaginable quark to the distant, blazing quasar. Inquiry and the National Science Education Standards is the book that educators have been waiting for--a practical guide to teaching inquiry and teaching through inquiry, as recommended by the National Science Education Standards. This will be an important resource for educators who must help school boards, parents, and teachers understand "why we can't teach the way we used to." "Inquiry" refers to the diverse ways in which scientists study the natural world and in which students grasp science knowledge and the methods by which that knowledge is produced. This book explains and illustrates how inquiry helps students learn science content, master how to do science, and understand the nature of science. This book explores the dimensions of teaching and learning science as inquiry for K-12 students across a range of science topics. Detailed examples help clarify when teachers should use the inquiry-based approach and how much structure, guidance, and coaching they should provide. The book dispels myths that may have discouraged educators from the inquiry-based approach and illuminates the subtle interplay between concepts, processes, and science as it is experienced in the classroom. Inquiry and the National Science Education Standards shows how to bring the standards to life, with features such as classroom vignettes exploring different kinds of inquiries for elementary, middle, and high school and Frequently Asked Questions for teachers, responding to common concerns such as obtaining teaching supplies. Turning to assessment, the committee discusses why assessment is important, looks at existing schemes and formats, and addresses how to involve students in assessing their own learning achievements. In addition, this book discusses administrative assistance, communication with parents, appropriate teacher evaluation, and other avenues to promoting and supporting this new teaching paradigm.

Young Adult Literature In The Classroom

Author: Joan B. Elliott
Publisher: International Reading Assn
ISBN: 0872071731
Size: 11.59 MB
Format: PDF, Docs
View: 77

This new volume answers both questions by explaining how YA literature promotes learning across cultures, genres, disciplines, and grade levels, and by giving practical lessons and teaching tips

A Passion For Nature

Author: Donald Worster
Publisher: Oxford University Press
ISBN: 9780199831067
Size: 16.53 MB
Format: PDF, ePub
View: 40

"I am hopelessly and forever a mountaineer," John Muir wrote. "Civilization and fever and all the morbidness that has been hooted at me has not dimmed my glacial eye, and I care to live only to entice people to look at Nature's loveliness. My own special self is nothing." In Donald Worster's magisterial biography, John Muir's "special self" is fully explored as is his extraordinary ability, then and now, to get others to see the sacred beauty of the natural world. A Passion for Nature is the most complete account of the great conservationist and founder of the Sierra Club ever written. It is the first to be based on Muir's full private correspondence and to meet modern scholarly standards. Yet it is also full of rich detail and personal anecdote, uncovering the complex inner life behind the legend of the solitary mountain man. It traces Muir from his boyhood in Scotland and frontier Wisconsin to his adult life in California right after the Civil War up to his death on the eve of World War I. It explores his marriage and family life, his relationship with his abusive father, his many friendships with the humble and famous (including Theodore Roosevelt and Ralph Waldo Emerson), and his role in founding the modern American conservation movement. Inspired by Muir's passion for the wilderness, Americans created a long and stunning list of national parks and wilderness areas, Yosemite most prominent among them. Yet the book also describes a Muir who was a successful fruit-grower, a talented scientist and world-traveler, a doting father and husband, a self-made man of wealth and political influence. A man for whom mountaineering was "a pathway to revelation and worship." For anyone wishing to more fully understand America's first great environmentalist, and the enormous influence he still exerts today, Donald Worster's biography offers a wealth of insight into the passionate nature of a man whose passion for nature remains unsurpassed.