Criminal Procedure Supplement

Author: Joshua Dressler
Publisher: Thomson West
ISBN: 0314179798
Size: 19.59 MB
Format: PDF
View: 77

The 2007 supplement contains excerpts from the most significant Supreme Court opinions decided during this Court term, as well as summaries of other recent pertinent materials. The Supplement also includes selected federal statutes, and the full Federal Rules of Criminal Procedure, which can prove useful in your classes, especially in the criminal procedure course in adjudication.

Supplement To Criminal Procedure

Author: Joshua Dressler
Publisher: Thomson West
ISBN: 0314162097
Size: 13.10 MB
Format: PDF, ePub, Docs
View: 95

Criminal Procedure accompanies the casebook and provides updated material on criminal procedure, including new and relevant decisions in this area of law. Premised on the belief that criminal law is an exciting subject to learn and teach, this supplement to the popular casebook provides a balanced overview of classic and modern criminal procedure issues.

Prosecuting Crime In The Renaissance

Author: John H. Langbein
Publisher: The Lawbook Exchange, Ltd.
ISBN: 9781584775775
Size: 18.93 MB
Format: PDF, ePub, Mobi
View: 82

Our present system of criminal prosecution originated in England in the sixteenth century. Langbein traces its development, which was at its most intense during the reign of Queen Mary. He shows how the common law developed a system of official investigation and prosecution that incorporated the medieval institution of the jury trial. He places equal emphasis on the role of the justices of the peace as public prosecutors. The second half of the book compares the English system with those of the Holy Roman Empire (Germany) and France. He concludes by refuting the popular opinion that the English were strongly indebted to continental models. "This is an excellent work of scholarship, exhibiting wide research, erudition and analytical ability." --Joseph H. Smith, Harvard Law Review 88 (1974-1975) 485 JOHN LANGBEIN is Sterling Professor of Law and Legal History at Yale Law School. He has held academic positions at Stanford University, Oxford University, the Max-Planck-Institut fur Europaische Rechtsgeschichte and the Max-Planck-Institut fur Auslandisches und Internationales Strafrecht. Langbein is a member of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, the International Academy of Comparative Law, the International Association of Procedure Law, and other organizations in the fields of legal history and comparative law. Some of his most distinguished publications and articles include History of the Common Law: The Development of Anglo-American Legal Institutions (2009), Torture and the Law of Proof: Europe and England in the Ancient Regime (1977), and "The Supreme Court Flunks Trusts," Supreme Court Review (1991)."

The Japanese Way Of Justice

Author: David T. Johnson
Publisher: Oxford University Press
ISBN: 0195344235
Size: 11.87 MB
Format: PDF, Kindle
View: 68

Criminal proceedings in which people can lose life, liberty, or reputation tell us a great deal about the character of any society. In Japan, it is prosecutors who wield the greatest control over these values and who therefore reveal most clearly the character of the Japanese way of justice. In this book, David T. Johnson portrays Japanese prosecutors at work; the social, political, and legal contexts that enable and constrain their actions; and the content of the justice thereby delivered. Johnson is the first researcher, Japanese or foreign, to gain access to the frontline prosecutors who charge cases and the backstage prosecutors who manage and direct them. He shows that prosecutors in Japan frequently harmonize to imperlatives of justice that Americans often regard as irreconcilable: the need to individualize cases alike. However, their capacity to correct offenders and to obtain contrite, complete confessions from criminal suspects. Johnson argues that this extreme reliance on confessions occasionally leads to extreme efforts to extract them. Indeed, much of the most disturbing prosecutor behavior springs directly or indirectly from the system's inordinate dependence on admissions of guilt. The major achievements of Japanese criminal justice are thus inextricably intertwined with its most notable defects, and efforts to fix the defects threaten to undermine the accomplishments. Clearly written and skillfully argued, this comparative analysis will be of interest to students of Japan, criminology, and law and society. It illuminates unexplored realms in Japan's criminal justice system while challenging readers to examine their assumptions about how crime should be prosecuted in their own systems of criminal justice.